The 2% Solution: 30 Minutes to Transform Your Life

Shining Through Struggle: An Actor's Tale of Tenacity and Talent with Chardonae Manuel

January 10, 2024 Chardonae Kianne Manuel Season 1 Episode 41
The 2% Solution: 30 Minutes to Transform Your Life
Shining Through Struggle: An Actor's Tale of Tenacity and Talent with Chardonae Manuel
The 2% Solution with Dai Manuel
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As the soft glow of twenty-one candles awaits Chardonae Kianne Manuel, we sit down for an intimate conversation on overcoming personal battles and embracing the stage of life.

It's a privilege to welcome my daughter, an aspiring actress with a narrative that echoes the unwavering spirit of pursuing one's passion.

Her journey—marked by an indomitable will to hone her craft while navigating the academic rigors of a Performing Arts diploma—resonates with the hard-won triumphs that shape not just a career but an identity.

Health is more than a state of being; it's a path lined with challenges and growth, a truth Chardonae knows all too well.

Listen in as she unveils her fight against autoimmune disease, transforming how one perceives adversity. With an emphasis on proactive living and the healing power of fitness, her story unfolds, revealing the courage it takes to shift from feeling victimized to becoming victorious.

It's a testament to the strength found in vulnerability and the extraordinary outcomes of seeking support, particularly poignant for those in the spotlight.

Parenting, a dance of guidance and letting go, becomes all the more intricate when your child is on the cusp of adulthood. Chardonae's experience underscores the delicate balance between accepting help and the following self-discovery.

For parents and guardians alike, we thread the needle of advice, unraveling the importance of nurturing perseverance, embracing opportunities, and the gentle art of steering without stifling.

This conversation is an embrace of those shared moments—raw, real, and ripe with insights for anyone fostering the growth of a child in a world that spins ever faster.

To connect and follow Chardonae's journey, check out her Instagram profile


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Dai Manuel:

Welcome back to the 2% Solution Podcast. I'm your host, diamond Well, and today's episode is not just special, it's a family affair. I've got the most extraordinary guest with my eldest daughter, chardonnay Kyan. And well, a beacon of creativity and determination At just 20 years old, chardonnay is not only my pride and joy, but also carving out a remarkable path in the world of acting on screen and stage. Today, she's here to share her journey from overcoming challenges to chasing her dreams with relentless passion. Get ready for a heartwarming, inspiring conversation filled with laughter, wisdom and a few proud dad moments. So grab your cold brew or tea, just like Chardonnay, and join us for this delightful dive into the world of a young, aspiring actress making her mark one step at a time. Cheers, cheers.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Then good, good, good.

Dai Manuel:

Okay, well, I got my cold brew beside me, as you can all see, and in case you don't recognize the person beside me Wait, wait, you see it. You see it. That's right, genetics at work. This is my eldest daughter, chardonnay Kyan Manuel, now 20 years old. Oh my gosh, I feel old even saying that.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I'm closer to 21 than I am you know.

Dai Manuel:

Yeah, You're also closer to 21 than much closer than I am. It's very relevant that you are here today because everybody knows I'm a father, I've been dating my wife, but I've made mention of the girls on a couple episodes, at least hinting at them. Now I'm bringing them in full full because, you know, one of my five values is the 5Fs. Of those five values, one of which is family. Today, Chardonnay is going to be here to really paint a picture about herself, but some of the learnings and some of the amazing experiences and some of those memories that she has attached to those experience and how it's helped develop her into this nice, upstanding citizen of the world.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Whoa All right. Wow, intrub. And why the youngest person on your podcast? You?

Dai Manuel:

are so far Without that much. There's a personal trainer that will be on the show next month and he's 23.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Oh, so not that much younger, it's not.

Dai Manuel:

No, but it's. You're both in different places. You know he's down on the stage, you're here in Vancouver. And then but you know, for the sake of being on the episode today, why don't you just give us a quick little intro of who are you? Who is Chardonnay Manuel?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Okay, who is Chardonnay Manuel, daughter of Diamondwell, and Kristie Kennedy, older best sister of Brie? Brie N? Oh, you can't have her, she'll beat me on the youngest person.

Dai Manuel:

Just wait.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

But I'm turning 21 next year. I have a. I'm about to complete and graduate with my diploma in the performing arts at from Carolina University. I've been doing their acting for stage and screen program, which is a big part of my identity as of right now as a university student. I love to. Oh, I'm just thinking. I'm like what is there about me? I feel like that's a big question right now in my life of like who am. I, what am I doing?

Dai Manuel:

It is. That's a very astute question and you know, it's actually one of the four questions I shared on an earlier episode last month, where it's like clarifying questions, because when we get clarity, we feel confident, we feel confident we take better actions and that also continues to build more confidence and clarity. So it's like this back and forth, evan Flo. So it's great that you're doing that.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Why acting why?

Dai Manuel:

acting. Why acting? Because the little side note we were traveling for five years full time as a family. Last two and a half of those five years were spent in Bali, indonesia, where we were fine, had a nice little home going, things are fine. And then the teenage. Well, it was two and a half for me.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I took it for you guys.

Dai Manuel:

But you know, we always honored the kids and said if they wanted to return to Vancouver to finish their school experience, we would honor that. Sure enough, you know who played that card, this one right here. So let's talk about that. This has been something that's more than just a passion. This is something that you decided a long time ago, like when you're still a bit of a tween. You're like I want to act and then to watch. You just do it and then you only apply to one school. I mean, it's crazy.

Dai Manuel:

It's really crazy in that mental determination, but also that no, quit, no, I can't do it. It wasn't part of your vocabulary and because of mom, because we all know that she treats the camp that's the worst curse word in the house. Worst four letter C word ever Can't Anyway. So just tell us about that. Tell us about that.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah, I guess when we were living in Bali, like there wasn't a lot of theater things that I could participate in there and I'd grown up thanks to mom and dad and grandma and grandpa just doing a lot of like theater camps and things like at local organizations and summer camps and that sort of thing, like I always really loved it, like I love theater. If Bri and I were in a day camp, it was like she would do some arts thing or sports thing and I'd be like I want an acting class.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And then from the acting classes. I always, I always loved acting. And then when I was starting to be like great 10, I guess and thinking like, okay, what do I want to do? If I do, I want to go to university. I think I always wanted to go to university and like pursue higher education because I love school and I love education. I've always been like a big school nerd, so sometimes to a fault, and I've learned to balance that through university, which is great, where I'm not as like school dedicated driven it doesn't consume my entire being as it has in the past, but I really enjoy acting. And when I was deciding I wanted to go to CAP because it was a very reputable program, was local and close by and after traveling I wanted to stay close to family. I'm quite the clingy daughter at points where I'm like I wouldn't say clingy, but it's.

Dai Manuel:

You definitely value families.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I love family time and I wanted to be close to home and I had considered one school out East, but afterwards I was like I didn't really want to do their whole singing and dancing audition process and so CAP was the best fit for me and I decided it was like the only school I would apply for and I was like I got to at least try acting, because otherwise later on in life I know I would regret it.

Dai Manuel:

Oh my goodness, like yeah, and she's 20. And she went through this process a couple years ago when she got accepted into that program, so it was even at like 1718. This is sort of your train of thought, your mindset. What would you attribute to that mindset? Where's it come from?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Well, probably you guys a little bit, which is like just watching you guys mom, and dad, like you always pursued your own things and I've always had super supportive parents that are like wanting me to pursue whatever I want and I had that encouragement which I know not everyone in the arts does, which I'm super grateful for. They're super passionate of following your own interests and your own hobbies. Bri and I have always had tremendous support. They're like if you can figure it out and you can do what you want to do, then it's like why not With stopping you and it was really cool to save up for school, go through the application.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I remember, even though I'm really driven, I'm quite the procrastinator Sometimes things I'll be getting done is on the deadline. I'm working on it. But I remember this three of us like mom, you, me it was way past your guys' bedtime. You guys go to bed by eight or nine o'clock and this was like 11.30. At midnight my application was due. We're finishing writing my cover letter, finishing my entrance essay and all those things that were just like oh my gosh, do it tonight.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

That's right. And then, yeah, there was some yelling, some tears, some hug. I got accepted and it went really awesome and I was very glad. Yeah, just always having your encouragement and watching you guys, I'd say, is pretty, ricky. I don't know where else I would have gotten it.

Dai Manuel:

I think you know to give yourself some credit too. You have definitely absorbed a lot through just being around. I mean your mom and I used to just take you guys everywhere. I mean same with everybody Just everywhere. It was like your Toastmasters meetings, networking meetings, like we'd go traveling and we'd do microstatic competitions.

Dai Manuel:

I mean it was just like we were a four-song and so you were constantly exposed to more mature people, adults, adult situations, but also people would have adult-type conversations with you guys, and I think that also builds not only the confidence in kids but also it sort of eliminates this intimidation factor where most people look at especially kids to adults that are sort of a figure issue right.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah.

Dai Manuel:

So you're looking at people more as friends and as equals than a child to an adult, and I thought that was really evident in how you and Brie react with people and interact. So, that being said, we're going to also probably offer a lot of the skills that you now use in your acting. But let's talk about something just a little bit of a shift here, because in the last you've been someone that's, like myself, dealt with an autoimmune condition. Do you want to share what that is?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah, sure, I, when I was in grade five, got diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and now I don't. I now I think I'm just.

Dai Manuel:

What is that exactly? Just just real quick sort of run down and what those symptoms look like.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Basically it's normally something that happens as you age. It's like I think most people know arthritis when you're older. It's like joint and bone pain and just it's basically how the doctors have described it to me and how I understand it from when I was in grade five is that my own immune system like is attacking my own body. So I have a decent immune system and because of that it's too good. It attacks my own body once I get sick or just to like sort of attack my joints and then they'll get inflamed and then it's like painful sometimes to walk or move. But I've been pretty much in remission, like for a few years now, solidly and such, but still on some medication and that medication like suppresses my immune system. So that's what makes it like an autoimmune disease. But yeah, we've both got that. It's not like there's a history of juvenile arthritis in our family. We don't really know why, but Wow it's immune.

Dai Manuel:

That's the thing with the immune system. It's a and I know those that are listening or watching this because I get messages from people regularly when they've heard about my autoimmune condition. I mean I had one later from the UK in particular. She was amazing but she couldn't find a lot of support or people connect. But over in the UK there's only, I guess, a few hundred people documented with the case, like myself. But also I'm one of those enigmats and normally because my immune system, obviously I have no neutrophils yet I thrive and so but doctors want you to live in a bubble.

Dai Manuel:

They would like that, but I think they also know I'm way more resilient than bubble life.

Dai Manuel:

So, but you made the shift. You've intentionally said you know what, enough is enough, no more victim. And you've really taken charge. You've made this huge commitment to your health and you've really not only made the commitment but followed through with action. So one, why don't you share with everybody what you've been doing? Because, for those that are dealing with an autoimmune condition, it's not a matter of trying to normalize working out. What I mean by that is a lot of people have it in their mind oh, I go to the gym, I do X amount of minutes, I do some cardio, I do some strength. You know like it's really very general and it's normal. It's just the normal view on it. You've basically said no, I want to do what I want to do for me and my health, because your health is the reason why you're there. Right, You're not there because you want to get a six.

Dai Manuel:

Well, that wouldn't be bad, okay, so well, there is some goals there in mind, but you know what I mean. So talk about what you've been doing and why Did you make that shift?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I guess, like it's funny, even though I don't think many people know this, but like my family, well, they know that they're very like health forward and like very physically active. I've grown up in that environment, which I'm very grateful for. But there's no hiding that for a long time I was very like resistant to that lifestyle. I was the one that was like I don't really like sports, I don't really like going to the gym or athletics, and like I was, I would do active stuff like playing on the playground, but I wasn't the free, was the one that would be like let me join in on the workouts and stuff and I would be like I'm just going to sit here and read my book, which is totally fine.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

But I was very like a lot of the time I considered myself like the black sheet of the family, even though that's not the case. No one ever. That was my own thing, that I told myself growing up, but not that anyone ever made me feel that way. I just didn't have the same interest as everyone else did. But over the past like couple of years, I think university everyone kind of goes through like a health thing and it can either take you one way or take you the other way, where you're like.

Dai Manuel:

I'm not eating very well.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I'm very I'm just thinking for Lee and drinking a lot and like all that stuff with lifestyle when it comes to like being a uni student, which is great experience. But I noticed last year around, like it was ongoing from like September last year until like March, where I just really was not very happy with like my body and my health and like my mind and all that stuff. I was really struggling with a lot of things and like self image was really bad and negative and everyone goes through that, which I know. But growing up I'd be like or at least I was like why, why don't I have a driver and interest, like my parents do, to like workout and be healthy? Cause I just really care? And then I started to see that toll and I wasn't very happy with that. And so then it was probably I think it was June or something with you guys it was we may or June time we had a pretty big like blow up and a fight just because I was dealing with a lot of things. And so then we we kind of like butted heads on on some stuff and I was like I'm not happy and I've been struggling a lot and that kind of exploded out of me and cause I'm I'm very independent.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I try to do stuff on my own a lot, but I knew that I had some really great resources with my parents which I kind of reached out to them, being like I don't really know what to do. But I want to change how I feel about myself, cause that was a big toll on me, especially as an actor. Like there's a lot of pressure on yourself image, I think, and not the industry, is changing for sure. But I had like I was like I, I don't know what I'm doing, I don't look good on camera, lalalala whenever all these like tales and stories, even though not the truth.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And then, mom and dad, I was, but like I needed something very simple to start, cause I'm like it's very daunting to like start changing things, especially when it comes to like diet and exercise. So then, dad, you were like okay, this is, this is your month starter kit. And it was like it was the summer, so I didn't have school, and so the routine I struggle when there's lack of routine for myself and similar. I think we're similar in that way. It's similar for a lot of people.

Dai Manuel:

Don't have a plan. It's really easy, just for grass.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Exactly. And so then we, you said, go for a 30 minute walk in the morning, do five minutes of mindfulness, slash meditation, do 10 minutes of gratitude journaling or just journaling, and then make a smoothie for breakfast a green smoothie.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And then that was something that I was like, okay, this is easy, 30 minutes, like it was a total an hour of my day to start it off. And I was like sometimes I spend sit in bed for an hour on my phone, so it's like, why not just do it, get up, get right. And I did that. And then mom and dad also got me a membership to the like YMCA or YWCA, which was really cool, and I went to a lot of like fitness classes, like I really enjoy classes. I find that's something that like has gotten me into something, because I'm not the type of person I really struggled to be like, okay, I'm going to the gym for an hour today, that's my own thing, that's my routine, like that's. I'm still working on that, on just going to the gym and doing stuff.

Dai Manuel:

Well, let's see, I'll see the fact that you're a social person, but that that what's important, to recognize your shirt and then everyone that's listening to watches. I know you're sort of nodding your head like, oh yeah, that's very good, because I hope everybody can see themselves and Chardonnay story. And I'm just so proud that you know you've come to some of these realizations so young, because when we catch them younger or earlier, seeing the changes through doesn't seem as daunting. It's also because you have a shorter lifespan, right now yeah.

Dai Manuel:

Fewer, bad habits or past memories, of feeling like I've tried this before and it didn't work Right, cause a lot of people just get really discouraged and feel a bit lost around that. And the fact is that you committed to something that was very simple, but I got to emphasize you committed. That was the biggest thing, because how many times in a moment I've come to you guys, and especially you, and offer not now, it wasn't like we were telling you what to do, but we would give you suggestions and turn to have a conversation?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

about it. You have so many programs. You have so many things. I know I got a lot of programs, but again, we're gonna play it again.

Dai Manuel:

Lol, you get upset about that. Also because you felt like we're pressure you to have to change. It's exactly what I felt when I was obese. As a teenager, I felt the exact same way, but when I made a decision that I wanted to get healthy, it was a lot easier to ask for help, because now I was in the driver's seat and I knew I needed help. You know, and I think that's where you got to. It's just great.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And it's funny because, like a lot of people will tell me where it's like your parents are so awesome and I agree fully.

Dai Manuel:

I'm turning that into a sound bite.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

That will be my new ringtone Every time Sharni calls me my parents are so awesome and I'm very grateful to have them as my parents. I think I won the lottery with that, but it's no matter what you want. No matter who your parents are. Some people have parents that are whatever their job is. It's like they're just your parents at the end of the day, so it's no matter what. Even though you're really healthy, you're just my parents Come on. You're just my coach and you and mom have created so many programs together that I have access to.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I haven't always had access to, but at your podcast I love what you're doing. I haven't listened to an episode yet because you're my dad and I'm like it's my dad, I hear him talk all the time.

Dai Manuel:

Dude, he gets so many more downloads. I know, I know I'm going to.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I'll listen to it. No, I'm going to listen to it, I just have it. But it's that kind of thing where it's like very resistant to your parents' help, even if the help is like professional in their field.

Dai Manuel:

Totally.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And it's like, yeah, my parents are awesome. But at the end of the day, it's like, yeah, you're still mom and dad, even though you do all this cool stuff.

Dai Manuel:

And you're absolutely right you know, we're seen as a very different figure in your life, which is fine. We are your parents' first, first and foremost, we're your parents and and I know it's not easy to take that in sights for my parents- because it's just the dynamics.

Dai Manuel:

We got history, and so the same applies of people working with good friends. There's always that concern. You know you've got this great friendship but now you try to work a professional commitment into it or something that might be a little bit more beyond just a friendship, and it can really challenge those relationships.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah.

Dai Manuel:

Which had challenged us a few times. But besides that, you've come to that place now and it's incredible to see how quickly things have changed in just six months.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah, is it really just like six months?

Dai Manuel:

Or is it a year and a half now?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

No, it was.

Dai Manuel:

No, I think it's. No, it was May.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

It was like May, june. June is when I think, I got my membership.

Dai Manuel:

OK. So yeah, we're coming on eight months On a week month. So that's still incredible. I mean, I know you For those who are just listening, chernee is quite slender, she's not a.

Dai Manuel:

She's very much like Christie. They have a similar body type and so Chernee is not just not a very big person, like big bones and all that, and so you were carrying a few LBs because on a smaller frame it shows much more quickly and I know that was affecting you mentally and emotionally, and but the fact that you said you know what, it's OK, I love who. I am, but I also love myself enough to make some health changes.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Like.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I didn't like how I ate and I wasn't eating very well, like lots of rice and pastas that weren't protein filled or just not healthy choices, and I was eating a lot and going out with friends a lot and I was buying lunch from school every day and money also wasn't smart choices and I knew I wasn't making good choices for myself. That, like always, I had you guys in the back of my head, like just from hearing you talk for years of like like all the advice and things that I hear you give other people, I'm like, oh yeah, I'm not following that right now, I'm kind of ignoring that. And it became a lot where I was like I don't, I don't like it and very sad looking in the mirror and that kind of thing and it's not fun to do.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

But, I thought better you did.

Dai Manuel:

Well, no, you just said OK and that's enough, and you just started trusting that if you did the right things, the right results would come.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah, Something is better than nothing. With like my philosophy.

Dai Manuel:

Yeah, but you committed to doing a little bit of something every day. You know what started as a basically a 30 to 60 minute commitment, five days a week. You know it's now become a lifestyle for you. So it's like, anyways, it's just, it's awesome to see, and, as I've made notes, younger people tend to adapt a little bit more quickly. You know that, old cliche, you can't teach dog Well an old dog nutrients.

Dai Manuel:

Well, that sort of applies to that idea of neuroscience, and we have some pretty big habits, and the bigger they are, the harder they are to change, ok, so Well, let's talk about that. You know that concept of doing something rather than nothing.

Dai Manuel:

Get an example of how applying that philosophy has led to success in a very recent project actually yeah, it's the site for that because I think that's a good attitude, that's that idea of progression over perfection. And so, you know, let's hear about this from a, you know, a 20-year-old perspective. Let's see this, let's hear this.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah, when I guess, like this summer I in the previous summer, so I guess like summer of 2022, between school, I was like still having I was that's one kind of like mental health and like I was more impacted about my acting abilities and like different things, like that feeling like, oh, I'm not doing enough or I'm not progressing, just different self-doubt when it came to like my education and I had contemplated like leaving the program between first and second year, but I'm really glad I stuck it out, it's worked out very well. But just having doubts along that of like what am I doing? And so this summer I knew that I wanted to like do more with acting. Yes, I did. I worked in a restaurant to like fund my education during the summer, but at the end of the day, I was like priority number one is to just do whatever I can and say yes to as many opportunities when it came to acting and like performance. So what I did was I submitted a lot of auditions for independent and student projects here in Vancouver and it was.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

It's daunting, obviously to be like, okay, I'm not, I'm not booking that many roles, but like, realistically, you're going to send or submit X number of auditions before you even get a callback, and so I kept track of everything. I was like this is the ones I've reached out to, these are the ones auditioned for. And then, like I kept, I have a whole notes page of like all the projects I submitted for and just super proud that it was like a regular routine and I was able to actually do quite a good number of projects this summer and like two leads and like to a lead in two different short films VFS, which was really awesome. The Vancouver Film School.

Dai Manuel:

Very cool.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

And like I'm super proud of those projects and happy they aren't publicly released yet absolutely they will be, I think, but they're really cool. And then I did some smaller roles and other projects there. I did, like I think, eight different projects over the span of three, three and a half months, which was really awesome to like go from having done nothing the summer before and then doing just whatever I could, and I, yeah, it was just like I'm going to say yes to as many progressing opportunities because something is better than nothing. Even if I don't book any of the roles, at least I'm practicing by submitting a ton of self tapes. My iMovie is like 60 different self tapes.

Dai Manuel:

I think it's your diligence and your ability. Well, it's also. I mean, we should tell everybody what one of your favorite songs is, because you are a bit of a swifty. So what's that favorite song of hers?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Well, I really like the. I like a lot of her songs, but when asked for a theme song I was like shake it off is kind of fun because it's just got a good message, a good vibe, but I definitely love Taylor Swift and shake it off is just such a good, like pump up song.

Dai Manuel:

And if somebody has a pair of swifty tickets they feel like they need to get rid of, I know somebody that would probably be willing to exchange babysitting for life.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I'm not sure. Please, I'm still on the market for some Taylor Swift tickets.

Dai Manuel:

I still can't believe how quickly they sold it Incredible.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Didn't even get a pre-sale I know.

Dai Manuel:

Okay, as we're getting close to the end, let's talk about some practical stuff. I know we've covered a lot of things today and you know some very practical insights that I know are very helpful for people listening to this, especially other parents, and I think, speaking from that perspective, I think you know, as someone that's sort of on the young adult side of things now you're not really a kid anymore, you're not a teenager anymore but what would be some helpful advice you would give to other parents that maybe see their children dealing with some negative habits and what I mean by that is maybe overconsumption of social media, because we know that can affect our mental health quite drastically to a screen time, maybe not enough physical activity, maybe poor eating choices. So we recognize that these things contribute to how we feel about ourselves, how we perform, but that's all common knowledge. However, that all being said, it doesn't mean people adopt some of the healthier habits. What would be your advice to parents that want to support their kids with big changes like that?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Oh, that does. That's a very big question and I don't have, like a lot of experience when it comes to other people or myself.

Dai Manuel:

Oh, from your own personal experience, you know, like, what do you think would be a good idea, you know, for parents, or a different way for them to look at? Because from a perspective of a child to a parent, that's what I'm more interested in. They all know my opinion, but my opinion obviously wasn't the best way of doing it until you came to a decision and said I want to do it. So I think it's just knowing that there's always going to be that bridge that we need to span.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Yeah.

Dai Manuel:

What do you think some practical advice that parents can take from today's conversation?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

At least for me. I think, even though I was resistant to a lot of health and stuff for a long time, it was still good to know that like they did care and they didn't want to help and had differently as a parent like I would I totally get it. You don't want to just I assume you don't want to just sit aside, watch your kid like deteriorate or spiral in like unhealthy habits, in whatever capacity that is, and I think it would, even though it may cause some fights. I guess it depends on the relationship you have with your kids. But I have a very close, open relationship with my parents, which I am very happy about. Sometimes you don't have to tell us that much. Dt, help me.

Dai Manuel:

Yes indeed.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I'm a talker, I like to talk, but even though I don't think there's anything wrong with reaching out and giving reminders or asking questions, I think opening the conversation up, even if it may cause a bit of tension in the short term, still was beneficial in the long term. Yes, there was points where we were very angry with each other just because we weren't really listening to each other, but then it's as soon as you have to wait for them to admit that they won't help, but having you guys have talked about it before and ask them what they think would be most helpful for them If they, once they are aware that they want to make changes or be different or need help, that's the most helpful thing, I'd say, like asking them Listening, yeah, listening and asking them Giving a prompt was helpful because I was like, yes, you have all these resources.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

It was a little overwhelming because you have so much knowledge and so much that you can give help with and save for online. I'm sure, like there's so much out there, but having something super simplistic that wasn't overwhelming or that demanding really was easy for me to have a routine.

Dai Manuel:

And that's what I asked.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I was like I need something simple that I can do daily and isn't that taxing? And then I built on myself.

Dai Manuel:

Yeah, you did Okay, so that's, I think, practical insights there. It's really a matter of giving them space to be able to give the support, if they can identify what the support is. But it's really just being there to offer, being willing to give the support when it's asked for.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Because it will be in the back of their heads, like it was obviously in the back of my head for a while of like okay, I know I'm not really being healthy, I know it's kind of being noticed by my parents and I know they want to help me, but like I don't want that help right now, but, then eventually, when I did, it was like the bridge was already there.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

I didn't have to reach out myself. So even though you may be nervous to like, bring something up. I think it's always beneficial in the long run, but at least for our relationship.

Dai Manuel:

I like it. That's very insightful. Good job. Okay, well, we're pretty much out of time, but I think you know the cool part is is this can be one of many. We could have some future conversations, because I know we sort of covered a lot of topics today, Big spanned. And obviously we didn't talk about what was like.

Dai Manuel:

I'm leaning as a family, so from your perspective and also doing road schooling versus traditional schooling. What was that like? So I'm sure there's people out there thinking, geez, I'd love to ask more questions of Chardonnay, and so what I like to encourage the listeners to do is, if you do want to ask some specific questions and you want me to have Chardonnay back so she can answer those questions, just shoot me a message on social or shoot quick email Even if you go to the show notes, you'll see all my contact info there and shoot me a message. But for the meantime, if you want to stay connected with Chardonnay, what social media are you most active on?

Dai Manuel:

Oh, Instagram is pretty much it.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

It's like it's my personal page, but I have it public for like my acting as well. So, I post different things about like my school and my acting and just like life stuff. So, if you want to, I'm tagged in a lot of my father's things, so I'm sure you can find me there, but it's just Chardonnay Manuel. I'm super grateful for my parents. They secured, like before Bri and I were, even social media age. They secured all our named stuff Butcomca. I've had my own website for like 12 years, but I didn't.

Dai Manuel:

I got that when you were born. You got that when I was born. I've had that domain now for like 20 years.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Oh my gosh, I didn't know that.

Dai Manuel:

I recommend everybody buys at least their namecom, you know, and then or at least especially, your children. So when they do get it, at least they have the choice. But it's hard if you get a really common name. You're kind of in trouble. I've been pretty fortunate I got a unique name, you've got a unique name, especially we spell it. So, yeah, ok. Well, chardonnay, thank you for being here today. Thanks, dad, and before you leave, what would you like to leave everybody with today, sort of a final message?

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Oh, oh, there's so many things I think like I get overwhelmed very easily with like, and I'm sure like a lot of younger people do as well, and anyone but, especially like people in my stage of life where it's like what am I doing when it comes to like career or relationships or education or anything like that.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

It's very daunting and like I'm about to graduate, but which kind of crazy. Four months, four months, what? But I'm looking forward to the future and I think leaving people would be like how, how, like goals for yourself in the sense of like I told myself this is going to be my year of concerts I have two concerts already scheduled and like fun things that you can just like thrive in life and enjoy Like all the other stuff can be very overwhelming, but sometimes it's OK to like ignore it for a short term amount of time. I don't know if that's very like beneficial, but finding things that is still enjoyable and benefits you as a person can help make the other more serious decisions less daunting, I guess because you're like hey, I'm figuring that out, but at least I got this going on.

Dai Manuel:

Well, it's true, because it also offers a little bit of control. And I think we all want a bit of control and so you are controlling sort of future experiences by making those little commitments. He also has things to look forward to. You know as much as you have to work through the work between those little events, you know I think it's good.

Chardonae Kianne Manuel:

Oh, and don't do things, or like say things for the sake of other people. I'm like trying to practice more, like doing things that I want and how I want to do things, like in applications, even for certain like internships or jobs. I'm like, ok, throw out what I think they want to hear, because I'm very like perfectionist mindset, where I'm like I want to do the best and like, let me, let me do what they want to hear. But that doesn't usually end up working out and it's better to take the risk of saying something they might not like if it's still true to you, so yeah, Well, I appreciate the insights today.

Dai Manuel:

Thanks, baby, good job. Oh, get him All right, and with that I'll say a G from now and walk back soon in the new year. Yeah, oh, my gosh. Yeah, it's the last one, I guess. Technically it's December 31st. By the time this goes live, it will be here, so Happy New Year, but that's great.

Dai Manuel:

Thanks, baby. Thanks, he's on. And that's a wrap on today's 2% Solution Podcast episode. Thank you to my incredible daughter, Chardonnay, for joining us and sharing her inspiring story. Our journey is a testament to the power of determination, resilience and staying true to oneself no matter the challenges ahead. Chardonnay's experiences, from navigating the world of acting to transforming her health and fitness habits, remind us all to chase our dreams and never give up. Her message about setting personal goals and staying authentic in a world filled with expectations is a valuable lesson for all of us. Thank you, listeners, for tuning in and sharing this special moment. If Chardonnay's story resonated with you or if you have questions you'd like her to answer in future episodes, don't hesitate to reach out. Stay connected with us and remember every small change brings us 2% closer to our goals. Until next time, keep pushing, keep striving, and here's to making every moment count. Hope you're having a great start to your new year. Everyone, let's make 2024 phenomenal.

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