The 2% Solution: 30 Minutes to Transform Your Life

Raising Emotionally Intelligent Kids: Insights from Sherman Perryman

December 06, 2023 Sherman Perryman Season 1 Episode 26
The 2% Solution: 30 Minutes to Transform Your Life
Raising Emotionally Intelligent Kids: Insights from Sherman Perryman
The 2% Solution with Dai Manuel
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Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered about shaping your individuality and nurturing determination?

Tune in for an enlightening chat with Sherman Perryman, a successful entrepreneur, podcaster, and author. Sherman delves into his "Militant Grind" brand philosophy, highlighting the significance of integrity in brand-building.

We'll also explore the challenges and joys of parenting, focusing on how to raise empathetic and understanding children. Sherman's journey, including his struggles with mental health, offers vital insights on maintaining mental wellness for success.

Discover the core pillars of Sherman's approach – love, honor, strength, discipline, and wisdom – guiding principles for overcoming life's obstacles and achieving success.

Don't forget to share your thoughts and feedback. Your engagement inspires us, and we value your contributions. Subscribe, share, and let us know what strikes a chord with you.

Join us on this journey of growth and inspiration. Stay tuned for more empowering discussions!

And if you haven't grabbed a copy of Sherman's book, From Grit to Greatness: Harnessing the 5 Pillars of the Militant Grind

Connect with Sherman

And be sure to check out his podcast, The Militant Grind Show.

Support the show

Have you ever wondered if you're truly living your best life or stuck in a never-ending reality show called "Why Do I Keep Doing This?"

Meet Maurice, a fellow Canadian who might be a secret wizard. He's created the Life Inventory Assessment.

At first, I was skeptical, thinking, "Sure, Maurice and I'm a unicorn."

I tried it, and whoa! I was so amazed I dedicated a podcast episode to sharing my "ah-ha" moments and clarity.

And here's the deal: This incredible tool for self-awareness can be yours for just $24.98!

That's not only a massive 75% discount; it's also just one penny short of the cost of a one-month Netflix binge of high-tier shows.

Along with this life-altering assessment, you'll also receive Dr. Douglas Tataryn's e-book, typically priced at $37.

And because I believe in overdelivering (or maybe it's just too much coffee), you'll also get my "Dai Manuel's Whole Life Fitness Manifesto" – a guide to living your best life, valued at $24.

As the cherry on top, Maurice and I will take you on a masterclass journey where we'll spill all the secrets of maximizing your newfound self-awareness.

Visit www.QuestForClarity.com, and let's turn your life into the adventure it's meant ...

Dai Manuel:

Hey there, champions of Change, welcome back to your favorite slice of inspiration 2% Solution Podcast. I'm your host, diamond. Well, here, just sprinkle a bit of laughter on your path to transformation. Today we're turning the dial up to 11 because we've got a guest who's as rare as a snowman in the Sahara, the one, the only, sherman Perryman. Now get this. Sherman once said about himself I'm so unique even my DNA is shaking its head in disbelief. Now, that's not confidence with the capital C, I don't know what is. And, folks, he's got the life story to match that bold claim. In this episode, sherman's going to reveal a game-changing moment in his life, a 2% shift that redefined everything. It all began when he stepped into the world of fatherhood, suddenly, making a difference, went from a bumper sticker slope to his personal creed for his kids, for all of us, for our future and for a little fun, fact Sherman's life soundtrack don't stop believin'. All right, I'm not journeyed by any stretch of the means, but I love seeing that that was his soundtrack. Funny little side note, it's Kristi and I's song too, so I love seeing that come in. And if that doesn't scream epic journey, I mean I really don't know what to us. He's also going to dive into his book From Grit to Greatness. This isn't just your average success story. It's a journey through the militant grind and it's as gripping as it sounds. This might be just the pep talk your bookshelf is craving. Oh, and did I mention? Sherman is also a fellow podcast maestro. That's right. He's a wizard on both sides of the mic, and when it comes to the age old coffee or tea debate, sherman's mantra is coffee morning, noon and night. I think that's why him and I hit it off so well. He's a 24 seven kind of guy, a true testament to live in the grind. And what's the one book that revolutionized his world? Outwitting the devil by Napoleon Hill. And if he could have a heart to heart with anyone, malcolm X, imagine being a fly on the wall for that chat, from peddling cookies to being the shiny beacon of the entrepreneurial spirit in LA. Sherman Perryman isn't just a story of success. He's a whirlwind, a lifestyle, a living, breathing dose of. You can do it too. He's not in it just to leave a footprint. He's here to forge a path for others to follow. So strap in, my friends. This episode isn't just another podcast, it's an adventure. Sherman Perryman is here to give us a turbo boost of motivation, stir the pot of possibility and remind us all of the unstoppable force within each of us. Let's jump into this exhilarating ride. All right, the 2% solution podcast with Sherman Perryman is kicking off right now. Let the fun and inspiration begin. Welcome to the 2% solution, sherman. It's great to see you, brother. It's been a little while since I was on your podcast and I'm so honored to have you back here. Hello, how you doing?

Sherman Perryman:

Great, great. How are you?

Dai Manuel:

I'm doing much better. Now that I'm looking at you, I'm like I just remember our first conversation and how amazing it was. But it was me answering your question, so it's nice to have the tables turned, as they say. Today. I get to ask you some cool questions and in the intro I gave people the background, your bio and some of the highlights what in your application. Because, hey, everybody listening there's always us podcasters. We always like to. Well, we're kind of lazy, and so, rather than going and trying to figure out everybody's links, people fill out applications and tell us some of the things that we want to know before the show, and so I ask a very specific question, and it's a question around uniqueness, in particular, one of a kind. And so, sherman, I'm going to turn the mic over to you because you said there's no one on this planet quite like you, and I would agree, but I want you to share a bit more about what makes Sherman Perryman truly one of a kind.

Sherman Perryman:

Well, there's layers to that because scientifically that's true. But then me, I grew up with two younger brothers in the household, right? So we're all a year apart Like one. I was born one year, second year, third year, and then I started to see that even though we grew up with the same principles, same exact parents of same schools, everything like that, we're all different in our all unique way. No, and I will hear other family members say, well, you're just like your dad and you're just like this, so you're just like that. But in reality we're not. Because, say, I'll give this example, right, say, if I'm talking to a girl and I'm in love with her and she breaks my heart, that is a traumatic event in my life that no one else has experienced or even hear about. That's going to shape my trajectory on how I think and how I feel about myself. And we all have these personal traumas, these personal issues that we go through that shape us and personal experiences. Even though we have the same genetics, we have the same like principles, things like that, we are all different in our all unique way because we think different, we go through different things, we eat different foods, etc.

Dai Manuel:

Well, I love that and, for everybody that's listening right now, you gotta go check out everything Sherwin does, especially his Instagram account, because I think there's a lot of inspiration thrown down. But, more importantly, your podcast, and I'm not going to get into it too much because I'm going to let the show notes do the talking. I want people to go and check out some of those episodes. But I know that we've talked about this idea of a 2% pivot right, or this moment in our lives where things could have gone one of two directions, but for some reason we chose very specifically and intentionally to go one of the two directions and sort of refer to this as this 2% moment in life right. And you mentioned that becoming a father completely reshaped your perspective, not only on the world, but your role in the world, also just your desire and intention to make the world a better place, but not really for you, more intentionally for your kids and their kids to come. And do you mind elaborating on that and just sharing, because I think it's just wonderful? I really do.

Sherman Perryman:

Yeah, because, well, I would say, growing up as a young man, you're kind of selfish, you don't care, like oh, somebody around the corner just got beat up or this robbery, hey, it has nothing to do with me, whatever. But then you think about when your child is out there in the world and the possibility of something happening to them and how you would feel. It's kind of like it wouldn't be a good feeling if your daughter was the one to go to a party and have some drinks to get taken advantage of, or growth or anything like that. Like you would be pretty upset, but then it's also likely for it to happen. Period, we have no idea. So, with that being said, I was like I have to start being more conscious of my environment and spreading the word about things that I believe are right, because we have to be a little bit more outspoken in order to make a change, because, even though you may think that it will fall on deaf ears, one day it might spark. Like a lot of people tell me I didn't understand what you were saying. At first I was angry at you. They couldn't really process some of the things that I've told them. And then, a year or two later like wow, now I understand it. So here in that, I just became a guy like no matter what I'm, a stand on righteousness, what I believe is right and period, no matter how anybody feels. They may not get it now, but they'll get it later. And, with that being said, it's kind of like a trickle effect on changing the world and changing your environment, because one person changed. You could talk to one person, that person talked to somebody else, the next person, just goes on and on and on. You may be unintentionally aware of the changes that you brought in the world, even though you have, just by talking to one person or sparking one mind.

Dai Manuel:

I was going to say. You know that. I just love that you really focus on that. So there's a two-way perspective, right, we have the external view and then we have the internal view. But it's amazing how that internal view adds filters to the external view. Right, the way that we look at things internally, especially from our own emotional state, psychological state, all those experiences that have accumulated to this moment, right, but the way we look at the world is often heavily influenced by that. And as a father, because I think this is really practical, what is it that you do? How do you broach some of these conversation pieces with younger people, like maybe not even your children, but your friends' children? Because I find that this is a conversation that sometimes is really challenging to have with kids, especially as they get more into the teen years, because they already think they know it all. Right, and I'm curious could you offer some tips on how to start navigating these bigger conversations? Right? And really, when we start talking about the worldview and work with our kids to mentor them and nurture them, to have a very kind view, but also a view that they can make a difference, right, because then, after this, I want to get into the book because people got to hear about what your book that just came out, as well as understand the militant grind philosophy, which I think is a game changer. Before we get to that, just give us a few tips on how to best have these conversations with our kids.

Sherman Perryman:

I'm just to be brutally honest with them, maybe vulnerable with them. Now, those are some of the two main things With my oldest daughter. She's 10. I'll talk to her like she's an adult because I know she has a consciousness to understand how things operate and I give her grace. I'm vulnerable with her, but also tell her that, hey, there are certain lives that you can't cross with me just because I am your father. We're not like best friends and go back and forth and talk a mess about each other. But I am honest with her on how the world operates. But I also give her stories and examples based off of what I had to deal with growing up, which in turn becomes my vulnerability. Like, hey, I know how you feel, I've been through this and when they could talk to somebody that they could relate to, that've been through some of the things that they're going through, it's a better form of understanding Instead of me just ruling with an iron fist and saying, no, it's this, because I said it, I let her know, I break it down, and when I break it down to where she can understand it or for when any of my kids can understand it, it's way better. I don't have to discipline her. I don't have to whoop her. She is the greatest kid. If I say, do something, she'll do it. But why? It's because I was nurturing her mind into being an understanding, loving and kind person, but also letting her know and letting and also giving her a form of understanding of being conscious of how you treat people, because you want to treat people how you like to be treating. How would you feel if daddy said this to you? How would you feel if someone said this to you? That doesn't feel good, right? Oh well, you shouldn't do it to other people, you know. So I, I break it down, and so I like getting her mind to really be conscious of what she's doing and, with that being said in turn, it's like okay, I have to be more aware. It's not always about me, it's about all of us. We all have to survive in this world. Oh, so, just be aware of that and go for it.

Dai Manuel:

Sherman, I really appreciate that what you're really teaching and or asking them to get in tune with is recognize that, that empathetic side or nature in us, right, like that ability to see ourselves walking in someone else's shoe, you know, and not just see ourselves visualize it, but actually feel what it must be like. Cause I know that, for my daughters especially, I can really resonate with what you just shared and I know that that was something that was really instrumental with her own, my daughters, was that not just the vulnerability but more importantly for us, I found, was just this idea of really trying to help them better explain their emotions. Do you know what I mean? Cause I find emotions, especially as we're younger, and I mean I struggle now and I'm 47 years old, I still struggle communicating when I'm feeling, oh. So I know that with kids at that age it's also a big challenge because they might not have their vernacular yet right, like the vocabulary to describe. And I guess in those situations like how do you navigate that? Oh, like, how do you create I guess maybe this is better, this is more practical Is, how do you create space for sometimes these conversations to be had, cause they're not always easy conversations, right Like these can be really tricky at times, especially if it's involving this idea of disciplinary, being disciplinary with our children. You know like we're we're very playback parents, my wife and I, and I know that our discipline might be different, but we would be very stern to hold them accountable, especially when they were doing things that weren't the best way they could have done them. It is encouraging feedback and I'm just wondering do you have any words of advice on this or thoughts?

Sherman Perryman:

Well, one thing that I know that is effective is, when you talk to children, you get on their level. So you may have to stoop down and look to them eye to eye, which in turn like when I, when I first started doing that, it was like okay, no, I'm serious, I'm getting down to you, your level but then also notice that within that, I have to bring myself down to their level frequently to get a level of understanding, because I know that they're not adults, so I can't expect for them to understand like an adult at all. Well, I have to be like okay, this is a child, Put yourself in the place of a child, because we were children before, and then be a little bit empathetic towards their limited understanding. So that's the way. That's the way I do it. It's like come on, man, you were 10 before you know how this works. You know like you were.

Dai Manuel:

You were a 10 before. I can't remember that far back dude.

Sherman Perryman:

Well, yeah, it's like my eldest. She reminds me so much of myself and how I think, and so it's like she thinks just like me. It's kind of scary. So I have to like step back sometimes and be like you know what. You were like this too, so you know how to navigate Like this person is a part of you, so it's, it's a little, let's take some work. But then I noticed, growing up, my father would expect for me to be on his level, which was a disservice Cause. It's like, man, you're 30 years older than me, but now it's like, no, you have to get on the kids level, but just a little. No, bring your wisdom to their level so they could get it.

Dai Manuel:

I think that's such a simple well simple, but also highly effective. I can imagine that, like just, I do remember at times and it's interesting because it wasn't really in the disciplinary action but I remember doing that more in a consoling way, like when it was something really sensitive or serious, or if they were triggered at school over some sort of action that another student did or another kid in their class, like I remember we would get down to make them feel safe, and so I can see how this can also help on the other side.

Sherman Perryman:

So it's the same philosophy, but then it's just like enhanced yes, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Dai Manuel:

Well, you know what I want to talk about your book, okay, cause I know it just came out, so congratulations, it's not a small feat. And for those that are listening, you remember, during the intro I mentioned the title, which I love, by the way, from grit to greatness. I mean what, dude? That's a great title. That's a great title, thank you. And so give us a glimpse into the basic, core message of this book. But also, how does it align with your platform, in particular the militant grind, and the philosophy of that platform? So maybe I don't know which way you want to tackle this. Do you want to talk about militant grind first, then talk about the book?

Sherman Perryman:

No, no, no, it may give you the stage man, you just take it away. Not all plays into a park, cause I actually somewhat suggested me to write a book about, like the five pillars. So the five pillars are love, strength no love, honor, strength, discipline and wisdom right. So just to break down like simple vernacular is on like okay, this is what I abide by when it comes to my life and the militant grind philosophy. So I break down those five pillars and I give stories, I get personal stories, I get biblical stories, those stories about celebrities et cetera, just to get people a level of understanding on how to apply those five pillars. But also say that you know, just, these are just, this is just something that I abide by. You can just take it and do whatever you want with it. But this is just kind of like a base. So it's not like the end all be all, but I do feel like love, honor, strength, discipline and wisdom is our core to me. And yeah, man, I just, I basically just take those five, break it down, um, and then I, at the end of the book, I have a conclusion on how I like intertwine all five of those pillars and, yeah, it's pretty simple.

Dai Manuel:

So it's pretty simple.

Sherman Perryman:

A lot of goals, yeah.

Dai Manuel:

Well, simple doesn't mean easy, though. Yeah. What I mean by that is it does take action right, like people have to. Yeah, they can do, wanting to follow a roadmap, like and I appreciate that you're giving a framework that is very much your framework, that you've used to get from point A to point B to point C and navigate life, and just the fact that you're giving an example of a framework but also giving the flexibility that, yeah, there might be some values that are interchangeable, meaning that I might have a different value, that I want to replace one of your five pillars with right and but that's the subjectivity to it, and that's the I think the point is is that this idea of grit to greatness, it takes commitment right.

Sherman Perryman:

Yeah.

Dai Manuel:

I mean, if we want things to change, we got to want things to change and we got to do something about it. But I got to ask you though but why this book? Like, why were you drawn to write this book?

Sherman Perryman:

Well, it was a suggestion, but then I do feel like there are principles, that, because a lot of people will ask me like, hey, I want to pick your brain, or hey, I want your advice on something, right. But I was just like, okay, first I need to put out a foundation, you know. So what is my foundation? How do I operate? So let's say, let's just go with love, right? Love is the first pillar, but love is also very, very important Self love, familial love, love, just period, because love is a very important driver when it comes to success, when it comes to you wanting to be physically fit Um, you know. So this, whatever, for you to be the best you could be, you need love, a period. And self love is the most important to me, because if you don't love yourself, you can't project love to anybody else. So also break that down with that pillar. But then it's like, okay, I need something where it's like what, what is militant grind about? What are you about? How can I figure you out? And so, right, in that book it was supposed to be something small, but then it just got bigger. It's still, it's a short read, but then it was supposed to be like one page. But then, after a while, I started thinking about it. It's like no, I could really break this down. And so that's that's how it happened, because I feel like if you are out there, you're motivating people. You want people to reference you somehow or get to know you or just basically like getting your mind. So, instead of me talking to hundreds of people over and over and over or repeating the same thing, it's like hey well, check out my book so you can understand me, I'll give them some type of some reference. And that was one of the best things I've ever done, cause, you know, I've had one guy he's an author as well. He just wrote a book and he left me like a four minute message saying that's one of the best books he've ever read. Wow.

Dai Manuel:

What a call.

Sherman Perryman:

I break down the examples. It makes sense because I actually, like, went through certain things where I've relied on these principles to survive in the inner city or in life period or to get through some personal triumphs, because a lot of times when I read books I say Brian Tracy or Napoleon Hill or anything like that, they're giving examples of other people's lives. But now I'm just like I can give an example of my life because I went through so many things just to help them understand. You know why this principle is so important and so once I did that, I thought it was. It was.

Dai Manuel:

It's a lot more relatable for certain people to understand, you know it's also a great example of the power of reflection right and introspection, like this idea of reflecting back on past and sometimes we might refer to them as transgressions, right, or, but really it's just past experiences but now being able to see it for what it is positive, can we see the positive in that experience? Can we come out of it with the positives right, like learning?

Sherman Perryman:

if you will and I think it's, you've taken this to the next level because, also, you've come out with a learning, but you've also now given examples on how we can start to implement these changes for ourselves, you know, oh yeah definitely, definitely, because I do have an example where I possibly could have died if I didn't listen to my the wisdom of like looking at, of being in the streets and looking at certain people, seeing certain things and being like, okay, it's time to go, I could. I could feel it like my wisdom is telling me this is the right, based off of the information that I collected in my life, based off what I've seen, based off what I've heard, I need to leave. And as soon as I was leaving, I saw this like police officer walking up and then it just went down, telling you like we cross paths like right then and there, and me and my friend talk about it till this day. It's like we looked at each other. We was like I think it's time to leave. Okay, come on, let's go. And intuition, huh, yeah, the intuition, but also but that's that's in my wisdom, my wisdom chapter but yeah, it's very important because I know that there there were some. Everybody has these situations that you know they see, where they just like you know they probably just fight it with their ego Like no, I'm a say, or no, I'm gonna take this extra drink, or no, I'm a drink, and then I'm a drive, I'm gonna be okay, but something else is telling you, man, you're drunk and probably need to chill out. You know, there's some wisdom talking to you that you tend to ignore.

Dai Manuel:

Yes, oh my gosh, we get really good at ignoring it too, and my interest also is because we normalize that right Like it's a. It's just a normal way to deal with it, because we get very good. I mean I should actually reframe that and say I was really good at that. Okay, so I'll own it.

Sherman Perryman:

I'll own it.

Dai Manuel:

I'll own it. So I and I know that I wish I had a resource like this 14 years ago when I was going through my big changes, because I really found it challenging. I knew there was parts about me that I wanted to change certain habits. I wanted to change, but I struggled with understanding how to do it but also, more importantly, how to get in my own way, cause I was my own worst enemy, preventing me from making the changes. But a habit like drinking was the one that kept holding me back and I know, once I got through that it was important for me to find support and a coach, a mentor, even a health expert, to support me as I was navigating some of those peaks of discomfort. Let's say, oh and Right, I just have to say thank you for for bringing this out, but I'd be remiss if I didn't, because I know people are thinking okay and I didn't want to go too much into the stories, because it's a reason why we want to pick up the book is to get the good story.

Sherman Perryman:

But, yeah, I also people to understand how you got here.

Dai Manuel:

I know a little bit about this story, right Like selling cookies and church aisles to now being extremely well recognized and successful entrepreneur in LA. I mean that's, that's a pretty big juxtaposition there. So how the heck talk about some of those key lessons you learned during that transformative period of going from cookies in the church aisle to to now working as an entrepreneur in LA, one of the busiest and most? Well, let's just say it is a. Everybody knows LA, okay, and all you gotta do is go there. What? Oh, no way. Or you don't Tell us just some context of this, and I know we're getting down to the wire here, but please take a few minutes because I think. But I feel, remiss if I didn't allow you to touch you.

Sherman Perryman:

Yeah well, la is a city where it's like your reputation is everything you know, who you involve with, who you are, where you're from. It's like if you, if you come out here, you don't know anybody, there's always gonna be like a barrier of resistance. So with me, knowing that I tend to always like, I'm very protective of my name and my reputation, because that can make or break you. If you're known as a bad businessman or someone that does people dirty or shady, it's over for you. But you could be outcasted. Yes, it's pretty and see, I was like man. I heard this guy then decide it just goes around and goes around. If you're one of those guys that Changes their number every two years or something and you know it could be bad, I you might as well just move out the city, move to Vegas or something like that. My goodness, I was all always a Stickler on doing good business door right by people, even if I had to take a loss myself, and so that was very important to me as an entrepreneur, because we are all for noor you're gonna try out different businesses. So whatever you try out, or just make sure that you know what you're doing, you you're having the right prices, you're going right by people etc. And your crowd will always follow you with whatever you do because they know at the core You're a very good person. Because you might I say you might I say I have my real estate license, insurance license. I did all kinds of things but I could always go to of my crowd because they know, hey, whatever this guy touches, I know he's serious about it and he's kind of do good business. So it's no surprise that now that I came up with Melaton grind and Inspiring people, motivating people, giving people coming like a mental coach Because they've seen me go through a lot of things in my early 20s that people my age weren't doing at all I know one was working for New York life. No one did A commercial real estate. You know what I mean. So I was like, what is motivating this guy to get into all of these different avenues? So now I'm like, okay, I'm gonna break down my thought process and and I always love helping people too. So this is kind of like a. This is like a match made in heaven for me, because I always like to say, when it comes to business, if I know I cannot help that person, my moral compass will be like at the, at an all-time low, like I hate, absolutely hate door things when it's like I know him, but in the back of my mind I'm taking advantage of this person and that probably was my downfall when it came to a lot of sales positions that I would get in because it's very Predatory, but I would just like I would feel horrible, horrible, and they'll be like well, see the damn, were you who's gonna eat? But it's like I'm eating. But then I did a disservice to somebody and I know that it's wrong, but I'm just satisfying you because I'm hitting the numbers.

Dai Manuel:

Yes, oh, man, yeah, honor that integrity, though, like that must feel very good. Do you know what I mean? Like, oh, yeah, I appreciate that you're. You recognize that I, like you, recognize also the mental health aspect that happens when we do things that's outside of our integrity or goes against our integrity, right, like that tarnishes that integrity. Yeah, and I think that's really important to take note here, because your framework that you share in the book, and obviously the militant grind philosophy, like Clarity gives us confidence and I know the people listen to me sick and tired of me saying this, but it really is. Once you have clarity, you gain a lot of confidence. When you feel confident, you don't procrastinate, you stop doing a lot of the things that really aren't going to move the needle the right direction and you start to confidently do the right actions. Right, and I just do thanks, because All the tools and resources and everything that you're building on your platform, it's all about giving us clarity, man Better understanding how to navigate crazy thing called life, and I think the big vision for this okay, like a huge vision here, and I'm gonna give you a moment to not only answer this question, but I have one more question after this, which would be a real fast one. Milton grind dude, it's way more than a brand, you know, it's really. You're building a movement and and I guess, what is the long-term goal, what is the long-term vision that you have for a militant grind right and what is this legacy that you hope to create through all these various endeavors that you're doing?

Sherman Perryman:

I'm big to a lot of funerals with babies past couple years, and so the legacy that I want to leave behind is like man, this guy really Looked out for me. Or he helped me become a better person, or he changed my life. He changed the way I feel about myself. But then I could also reference it by going online or looking at his youtube videos, or this is at the third. So I want to leave like a imprint behind which pushed me to Start a podcast. Because it's like man, what if you died tomorrow and you know your kids are hearing these stories about you, but they have no way to see you. They can't hear you speak. They can. They don't have anything to reference and the internet is perfect for that, you know. So that's probably like the legacy I want to leave behind, because I know Myself I struggled with mental health. I was depressed for a couple years. They didn't know it. So it's like if I can help other individuals get over that hump and be the best versions of themselves, that's one of the best things I could do for the world and for my legacy. And the world does have to know that I did it. God could know that I did it, oh. And I will be perfectly fine, so we'll find with that.

Dai Manuel:

I feel like dropping my mic, but it's a new mic and I don't want to break it. I would totally drop it because, I mean, I find your content very inspiring, oh and motivating. But, also, at the same time, it educates, right, like. It just offers a shift in perspective and and I love that everything that you create is all about this perspective that we have Self-view, worldview right, and how do we? connect everything in between and I guess, as we sort of wrap up today, is there any Last message you'd like to leave for the listeners and for the viewers, so those that are here today Gobbling up all this great stuff Is there something that you'd like to leave us with today.

Sherman Perryman:

Well, let's just go. I'll just share the the pillar love again. Make sure that you love yourself and project love onto others and with that Is the foundation for a lot of change, because a lot of times we treat people how we treat ourselves. So love yourself so you can treat other people with love.

Dai Manuel:

Oh man Love it.

Sherman Perryman:

Love it Honestly. I do.

Dai Manuel:

And sure, man, I'm so honored to have had you here on the show today. Like I, I'm a big person, that I'm sorry. I'm a big proponent. I'm a big guy too, but I'm a big proponent of of really Trying to get people in front of the right people, if you know what I mean because I know when you get around the right people. It's amazing how things start to shift, and so getting people around you and your energy and what you're speaking to is very important. And I'm curious what, what would be the best platform for people to connect with you on, because obviously we have all these different. What's the one that you feels best for people to get their first impression, to really start to get to know you?

Sherman Perryman:

Let's say instagram and youtube Of sort to find those sources just militant grind calm. Okay, because everybody has their preferred source some people on tiktok, some people on YouTube, instagram, whatever, but I have them all. So if you they want to check it out, just know that's at grind calm.

Dai Manuel:

Perfect, okay, well, that these are all being the show notes for everybody listening, and also we'll have an action item, a one pager that you're going to have an opportunity to do, and I think it's going to be really around this idea of pillars and value, and I know that you have some great information that we can share with them. Sure, man, and so don't worry, there'll be more on that in the community later to come, but for now, best thing anybody can do is that link in the show notes that takes you to the website, or to go buy yourself a copy of Sherman's book. Sherman, it's been a pleasure having you on the 2% solution. Your journey and insights are testament to what can be achieved with resilience and determination. Thanks for joining us today and sharing your invaluable experience with Brother, and that, my friends, wraps up our fantastic conversation with the one and only Sherman Perryman. What a journey we've been on today. He deep dives into self-love and discipline, to exploring the realms of wisdom, honor and strength. Sherman has truly given us a masterclass in not just entrepreneurship but life itself. Sherman's book from Grit to Greatness isn't just a read, it's an experience. It's like your personal guide to becoming the best version of yourself, one chapter at a time. So if you're looking to get a little grittier and a whole lot greater, you know what to do. Grab a copy of his book. It's like a Swiss army knife of personal development, handy in every situation. And hey, just don't stop at the book. Follow Sherman on social media. His insights, stories and nuggets of wisdom are daily doses of motivation. Trust me, your feed will thank you for it. Now, if Sherman's stories struck a chord with you, if it lit a fire in your heart or sparked a thought in your mind, share this episode with someone else. Spread the inspiration like it's a confetti at a party. While you're at it, hit that like, share and subscribe button. It's the trifecta of podcast love. And speaking of love, a review from you would be the cherry on top of our podcast someday. Let us know what resonated with you, what made you laugh or even what made you pause and think. Your feedback is the GPS that guides our journey on the 2% solution podcast. Thank you for tuning in. Remember every day is a chance to turn your grit into greatness. Keep pushing, keep growing and let's keep making those small steps for big, lasting changes. I'm Diamond Well, signing off, but not saying goodbye, just saying see you soon. Stay gritty, my friends.

Sherman's Unique Journey and Solution
Navigating Challenging Conversations With Kids
From Grit to Greatness
Legacy of Integrity and Impact
Sharing Inspiration and Seeking Feedback

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